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Bean Beetle Culture, Living

Item # 144180
Bean Beetle Culture, Living is rated 4.0 out of 5 by 5.
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This easy-to-maintain beetle culture is ideal for use in a variety of reproductive behavior studies. All you need to keep it going generation after generation are beans such as black-eyed peas, mung beans, or adzuki.

Price

$16.50

In stock and available to ship.

This easy-to-maintain beetle culture is ideal for use in a variety of reproductive behavior studies. All you need to keep it going generation after generation are beans such as black-eyed peas, mung beans, or adzuki. Females lay a single egg on each bean. The emerging larva then burrows into the bean where it will feed, pupate, and then emerge as an adult beetle.

Adults do not require any food or water - they spend their short life span of 1 to 2 weeks mating and laying eggs. Design your own experiments or use the Experiments with Bean Beetles (item #144184) guide sold separately.

Culture contains 30 to 40 mixed adults set up on host beans.

  • This item contains living or perishable material and ships via 2nd Day or Overnight delivery to arrive on a date you specify during Checkout. To ensure freshness during shipping, a Living Materials Fee may apply to orders containing these items.
 

Living Organism Care Information

Living Organism Care Information

 
Rated 1 out of 5 by from only 6 living beetles out of 2 cultures. very disappointing We ordered 2 living cultures and only received 6 beetles that were actually alive. The cultures were obviously made up long in advance as many dead and decaying beetles were scattered throughout the order. DO NOT waste money on this product.
Date published: 2014-08-31
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Very useful for student research The cultures can be used to start rearing your own bean beetles or to initiate experiments. All beans carry larvae; they will therefore yield new beetles for the next 1-3 months depending on temperature. The beetles that come with the culture are several days old. At that time, they have already laid almost all of their eggs and cannot be used anymore. So be prepared to having to wait for emerging beetles to start experiments. Pretty much any temp/RH combination will do for rearing purposes. The warmer it gets, the faster they develop. For experiments, keep them as warm as possible, which speeds up development time and decreases variance, for maintenance purposes keep them at room temperature. The bean beetles are perfect for easy experiments in any area you can think of. I had very good results with group projects for my students. Lots of petri dishes and soft tweezers help with experimental setup and manipulation. They take all beans in the genus Vigna, but mung beans are cheapest, which you can get from several vendors. The beetles can be maintained for years with minimal effort. However, I would recommend to simply purchase new cultures when needed, because it takes a long time to obtain enough specimens for experiments from a low-maintanance, low number culture.
Date published: 2011-09-26
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Great for high school level projects! I recently used the bean beetles as part of a research experiment for my senior project. These organisms were very easy to handle, mostly because they did not fly. It was also very easy to tell male from female in this species. There are so many research projects available with these beetles, and they were fun to work with. I highly recommend these to teachers, or students who want to do some scientific investigation that is not too complex, but not as simple as grade-school work.
Date published: 2011-04-05
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Fantastic Little Beetle This little beetle is one of the easiest research specimens to keep. They're highly sexually dimorphic allowing even young children to be able to tell male from female, they don't eat as adults, and they only seem to prep their wings but never actually fly. I've had students use them to answer their own research questions about behavior.
Date published: 2010-03-24
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  • clientName_carolina
  • bvseo_sdk, java_sdk, bvseo-4.0.0
  • CLOUD, getReviews, 18ms
  • REVIEWS, PRODUCT