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Carolina LabSheets

  • Introduction to Sterile Technique In this lab, students practice transfer of a bacterial culture using sterile technique. View »
  • Isolating Bacteria from a Mixture How does a microbiologist isolate bacteria from a sample? In this lab students practice streaking a plate to isolate a single species of bacterium from a known mixture. View »
  • Bacterial Growth on MacConkey Agar In this lab students culture three bacteria on nutrient agar and MacConkey agar and record the results. View »
  • Two-Point Linkage with Drosophila In this lab students explore the genetic consequences of gene linkage using an F1 cross of Drosophila. View »
  • Three-Point Linkage with Drosophila In this lab students investigate the effects of gene linkage and crossing-over on the inheritance of three traits of Drosophila. They use the data they collect to construct a linkage map of the gene loci. View »
  • Testing for Segregation of Alleles In this lab, students test corn pollen for evidence of the segregation of alleles. View »
  • Meiosis and Genetics In this lab, students investigate how the events of meiosis relate to Mendelian genetics. View »
  • Lumbriculus: Contraction Rate of the Dorsal Blood Vessel In this introductory physiology lab, students determine the contraction rate of the dorsal blood vessel of the blackworm Lumbriculus. Students then design and conduct an experiment to determine the effect of temperature change or chemical exposure on the contraction rate. View »
  • Investigating a Phenotype In this activity, students investigate a phenotype that is not so conspicuous, and they perform a simple chemical test to reveal the underlying basis of the phenotype. View »
  • Introductory Genetics with Drosophila Use this LabSheet with a variety of our Drosophila cultures and sets for introductory labs covering monohybrid, dihybrid, and sex-linked crosses. View »
  • Introduction to Drosophila: Phenotypes In this lab students compare phenotypes of mutant Drosophila to wild type. The activity is intended as a student’s first experience working with Drosophila. View »
  • Introduction to Blood Types In this lab, students are introduced to the human ABO blood groups. View »
  • Genetics with Drosophila F1 Crosses: Sex-Linkage Drosophila genetics labs without the the need to select virgin female flies for crosses. We ship F1 flies so your students need only to set them up in fresh vials to produce an F2. View »
  • Genetics with Drosophila F1 Crosses Drosophila genetics labs without the the need to select virgin female flies for crosses. We ship F1 flies so your students need only to set them up in fresh vials to produce an F2. View »
  • Carolina LabSheets™: Gene Interaction with Drosophila How do genes interact in the inheritance of traits? Find out in this intriguing study of the inheritance of eye color in Drosophila. View »
  • Embryology with Rhabditis In this lab students observe cleavage of fertilized eggs of female Rhabditis. View »
  • Daphnia Heart Rate In this introductory physiology lab, students determine the heart rate of Daphnia magna and then test the effect of changing temperature on the heart rate. View »
  • Constructing a Cladogram with Hydra, Planaria, and Daphnia In this lab students compare the body structure and functions of three invertebrates to that of a vertebrate. They use their data to construct a cladogram. View »
  • Basic Mold Showplate Set This introduction to fungi focuses on the production of asexual spores by three fungi: Aspergillus, Penicillium, and Rhizopus. View »
  • Bacterial Motility In this lab, students perform two exercises that investigate microbial motility. One is on a microscopic level, using the “hanging drop” slide preparation method to directly observe motile cells. The second exercise is on a macroscopic level and involves inoculating motility test media. View »
  • Carolina LabSheets™: Bacterial Hydrolysis of Starch In this lab, students culture two bacteria on potato dextrose agar, which contains starch. When grown on potato dextrose agar, bacteria that can secrete amylase—an enzyme that hydrolyzes starch—create a zone around their colonies in which starch is absent. When the agar is flooded with iodine solution, most of the plate stains dark blue–black, but clear areas are left around colonies that secrete amylase. View »
  • Bacterial Hydrolysis of Lipids In this lab, students culture two species of bacteria on agar medium that contains an emulsion of plant oils and the dye, sprit blue, which forms a complex with the triglycerides of the oils and gives an opaque blue color to the agar. Colonies of bacteria that can secrete lipase, an enzyme that hydrolyzes triglycerides, develop a light area or “halo” in the surrounding medium, due to the diffusion of lipase into the medium and the resultant breakdown of the oil/spirit blue complex. View »
  • Carolina LabSheets™: Bacterial Hydrolysis of Casein In this lab, students culture two bacteria on skim milk agar. The protein casein gives milk its white color. Some bacteria secrete protease enzymes that can hydrolyze casein. When these bacteria are grown on skim milk agar a clear area develops around the colonies, indicating that casein has been hydrolyzed into its component amino acids. View »
  • Bacteria: The Indole Test In this lab students perform a differential test to distinguish bacteria based on the production of indole. Bacteria are grown on media containing tryptophan and then treated with Kovac’s reagent. If they possess the enzyme tryptophanase, the bacteria can metabolize tryptophan into indole, pyruvic acid, and ammonia. View »
  • Carolina LabSheets™: Bacteria: The Citrate Test In this lab students perform a test on two different bacteria to determine whether the organisms can use citric acid as their sole carbon source. The citrate test is often performed as part of the IMViC (Indole, Methyl Red, Voges-Proskauer, and Citrate) series of tests used to differentiate common species of enteric bacteria. View »
  • Introduction to Feeding Preferences in Caenorhabditis elegans The nonparasitic soil nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has served as a model organism for research scientists since the 1960s. This lab introduces students to the organism and provides them with the tools necessary to perform simple experiments. View »
  • Make a Hay Infusion Hay infusions are widely used as a source of microorganisms for studying decomposition, fermentation, and disease. And preparing one is easy--simply soak fresh or dried plant material in water. View »
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