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Carolina LabSheets

  • Introduction to Prokaryotes: Bacteria What are bacteria? In this introductory lab students make smears of bacteria on microscope slides from pure cultures, perform a simple stain, and observe their stained slides under a microscope View »
  • Introduction to Fungi This lab introduces students to the Kingdom Fungi through study of two phyla, the zygomycetes and basidiomycetes. View »
  • Introduction to Protista: Euglena Euglena was once studied as a simple animal by zoologists and as a simple plant by botanists. How does this protist combine some characteristics of animals with the plant-like ability to photosynthesize? View »
  • Introduction to Prokaryotes: Cyanobacteria In this lab students observe two examples of cyanobacteria and make a simple comparison to a eukaryotic green alga. View »
  • Bacterial Growth on MacConkey Agar In this lab students culture three bacteria on nutrient agar and MacConkey agar and record the results. View »
  • Introduction to Protista: Paramecium Complexity in a single cell. In this lab students observe Paramecium as an example of a complex ciliated protist. View »
  • Lumbriculus: Contraction Rate of the Dorsal Blood Vessel In this introductory physiology lab, students determine the contraction rate of the dorsal blood vessel of the blackworm Lumbriculus. Students then design and conduct an experiment to determine the effect of temperature change or chemical exposure on the contraction rate. View »
  • Introduction to Protista: Amoeba What characteristics do protists share with animals? In this lab students observe Amoeba proteus to find out. View »
  • Introduction to Blood Types In this lab, students are introduced to the human ABO blood groups. View »
  • Daphnia Heart Rate In this introductory physiology lab, students determine the heart rate of Daphnia magna and then test the effect of changing temperature on the heart rate. View »
  • Basic Mold Showplate Set This introduction to fungi focuses on the production of asexual spores by three fungi: Aspergillus, Penicillium, and Rhizopus. View »
  • Animal or Not? In this lab students compare an animal to an animal-like protist, or protozoan. View »
  • Dealing with Data In this introductory lab, students collect data and then devise methods to organize and display the data to give it more meaning. After brainstorming and evaluating their methodologies, they graph the data and perform a written analysis of their results. View »
  • Observing Plant Cells In this lab students observe Elodea leaves under magnification. They will see cell walls and chloroplasts. From the movement of chloroplasts they will infer that cyclosis, or protoplasmic streaming, is occurring. They also will observe that most chloroplasts are pressed tightly against the cell wall and should infer from this that much of the cell is occupied by a vacuole. View »
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