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3D Activities

 

Free Activities with NGSS* Performance Expectations
Carolina understands tight budgets. That’s why we developed Carolina Essentials™. This series of free activities follow NGSS-prescribed teaching and learning methods that include phenomena, big questions, student investigations, modeling activities, and assessment questions. Click Here to shop our Carolina Kits 3D Collection

 

  • Succession on Mount St. Helens In this activity, students analyze the eruption and biotic changes on Mount St. Helens since the 1980 eruption to produce evidence for the succession stage directly after the eruption and 30 years past. View »
  • Termite Pheromones This investigation demonstrates how soldier termites sense pheromones. Students observe and document motions of termites under 2 different conditions: pencil circles and pen circles. View »
  • Comparative Metamorphosis In this investigation, students observe development of 3 different insects from the larva or nymph stage through the adult stage. They also complete a comparative development study of metamorphosis, observing complete and incomplete metamorphosis. View »
  • Wisconsin Fast Plants® Monohybrid Crosses Inquiry In this scientific inquiry activity, students germinate F2 generation Wisconsin Fast Plants® seeds and identify the phenotypes and possible genotypes of the F2 generation plants. View »
  • Introduction to Wisconsin Fast Plants® Phenotypes In this inquiry activity, students investigate phenotypes using Wisconsin Fast Plants® seeds. After the seeds germinate, students identify the phenotypes and the possible associated genotype. View »
  • Which Leaf Shape Can Hold the Most Butterfly Eggs? In this elementary-level activity, students investigate the relationship between leaf shape and the number of butterfly eggs that can be laid on a leaf (grades K–5). View »
  • Using Algae Beads as a Model for Photosynthesis Introduce students to photosynthesis with fresh water algae. By creating algae beads (made of algae and sodium alginate solution), they indirectly observe the change in concentration of oxygen in beads that are exposed to different amounts of light. View »
  • Photosynthesis Introduce students to photosynthesis in a visual way. As Elodea uses carbon dioxide from an initial solution, a change in pH occurs, causing a color change in the solution. View »
  • Invertebrate Biodiversity and Abiotic Factors Understanding the relationships between biotic diversity and abiotic factors in an ecosystem can be a difficult task. Using soil invertebrates, students can identify both the number of species present in a soil sample and the number of individuals within a species. View »
  • Pill Bug Behavior Choices This introductory investigation into animal behavior uses pill bugs and choice chambers. Students begin with an experiment to test how pill bugs respond to humidity and can go on to design an inquiry to test another environmental factor. View »
  • Sense of Smell and Olfactory Fatigue In this introductory activity, students use fragrant oils to determine the time of olfactory fatigue for both of their nostrils and examine the link between smell and memories. View »
  • An Inquiry into Seed Germination This NGSS-aligned activity is a student inquiry into factors that affect seed germination.Use it as an introduction for plant studies in biology or as an environmental impact investigation in earth science, environmental science, or agricultural science. View »
  • Ocular Dominance How does the brain process information from both eyes? This short activity introduces the senses, sensation and perception, and evolutionary differences in predator-prey relationships. View »
  • Reaction Time and Practice Introduce students to reflexes and reactions, the nervous system, or learning theory with this engaging activity. View »
  • Constructing and Testing a Dichotomous Key Model for Fruit This investigation requires students to create and test a model for fruit classification. Use it as an introductory inquiry into taxonomy for life science classes or as an NGSS Dimension 1 Practice in life science, botany, or agricultural science classes. View »
  • Hydroponic Nutrient Solution After a structured investigation of a hydroponic technology, students design an experiment to test different nutrient solutions. View »
  • What Do Plants Need To Grow? Explore the phenomenon of plant growth with this guided inquiry activity. Students use seed disks to determine the amount of sunlight and water plants need to grow. For grades K-2. View »
  • Materials Plants Need to Grow Examine the phenomenon of plant growth by designing and carrying out an experiment to show that plants need air and water to grow. For grade 5. View »
  • Homeostasis in Animals Introduce students to homeostasis with this activity. Gather data on set point or resting heart rate, exercise, collect data again, and relate the data to negative feedback mechanisms. View »
  • Comparing Land and Water Plants How are land and aquatic plants different? How are they alike? In this activity, students compare an aquatic plant, common duckweed, to a terrestrial plant of their choosing. For grade 2. View »
  • Survival: Sow Bug Behavior In this investigation, observe how sow bugs change their behavior when the dampness in their environment decreases. For grade 3. View »
  • Don’t Quote Me on That: Math Attitude Card Sort Students' preconceived notions about their skills can be as large a stumbling block as the lack of skills. This short activity helps students identify their applied mathematics strengths, weaknesses, and fears. View »
  • Invertebrate Biodiversity with Berlese Funnels Using soil invertebrates, students identify the number of species present in a soil sample and the number of individuals within a species. With some simple math, they can then calculate the density of invertebrates in a plot. View »
  • Survival: Swim to the Light For this lab, students gather observations of algae in full light, change habitat conditions by reducing light, and apply the observations. Essential question: Can all organisms survive equally well in the same habitat? View »
  • Decomposition by Physarum polycephalum Observe the phenomenon of the plasmodial form of Physarum polycephalum as it streams in search of a food source. Essential question: What role do decomposers play in an ecosystem? View »
  • Owl Pellet Food Webs: A Model of Energy and Mass Transfer Explore the phenomenon of owl pellets and construct a model food web for barn owls with this activity. Guiding question: How do energy and mass flow through a food web? View »
  • Introduction to Cladogram Construction In this activity, students use observable traits of animals as a line of empirical evidence supporting common ancestry among the animals. View »
  • Calorimetry: Measuring the Energy in Foods In this investigation, students determine the calories, or heat content, of 3 different foods. View »
  • Corn as an Introduction to Mendelian Genetics Introduce your students to Mendelian genetics with this activity that uses parental stocks of yellow and purple corn. View »
  • Accuracy of Glassware In this activity, students use density calculations to establish the accuracy of several common pieces of lab glassware. View »
  • Natural Selection of Leaf Thickness on Planet Eorthe, Galaxy Tlaloc In this introductory activity, students graph and analyze data, observing trends and change over time. The data set consists of leaf thickness measurements taken 4 times during a growing season and the number of fruits produced by plants with each thickness of leaf. View »
  • Phenology: Spring Leaf Index Phenology studies are crucial to determining disruptions in environmental relationships. In this activity, students use data to support claims of environmental changes. View »
  • Human Impacts: How Can Our Impact Be Assessed? In this introductory activity, students look at pictures of similar activities to decide what the impacts are to the environment, what data should be collected, and how to collect it. View »
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