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3D Activities

 

Free Activities with NGSS* Performance Expectations
Carolina understands tight budgets. That’s why we developed Carolina Essentials™. This series of free activities follow NGSS-prescribed teaching and learning methods that include phenomena, big questions, student investigations, modeling activities, and assessment questions. Click Here to shop our Carolina Kits 3D Collection

 

  • Comparative Metamorphosis In this investigation, students observe development of 3 different insects from the larva or nymph stage through the adult stage. They also complete a comparative development study of metamorphosis, observing complete and incomplete metamorphosis. View »
  • Which Leaf Shape Can Hold the Most Butterfly Eggs? In this elementary-level activity, students investigate the relationship between leaf shape and the number of butterfly eggs that can be laid on a leaf (grades K–5). View »
  • What Do Plants Need To Grow? Explore the phenomenon of plant growth with this guided inquiry activity. Students use seed disks to determine the amount of sunlight and water plants need to grow. For grades K-2. View »
  • Materials Plants Need to Grow Examine the phenomenon of plant growth by designing and carrying out an experiment to show that plants need air and water to grow. For grade 5. View »
  • Comparing Land and Water Plants How are land and aquatic plants different? How are they alike? In this activity, students compare an aquatic plant, common duckweed, to a terrestrial plant of their choosing. For grade 2. View »
  • Survival: Sow Bug Behavior In this investigation, observe how sow bugs change their behavior when the dampness in their environment decreases. For grade 3. View »
  • Survival: Swim to the Light For this lab, students gather observations of algae in full light, change habitat conditions by reducing light, and apply the observations. Essential question: Can all organisms survive equally well in the same habitat? View »
  • Owl Pellet Food Webs: A Model of Energy and Mass Transfer Explore the phenomenon of owl pellets and construct a model food web for barn owls with this activity. Guiding question: How do energy and mass flow through a food web? View »
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*Next Generation Science Standards® is a registered trademark of Achieve. Neither Achieve nor the lead states and partners that developed the Next Generation Science Standards were involved in the production of, and do not endorse, these products.