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Classroom Activities

  • Exploring Air Resistance Investigate the relationship between velocity and air resistance. View »
  • Violet Shines Blue Classic demo with a violet laser pointer may be used as a discrepant event to discuss light waves, fluorescence, or chemical quenching. View »
  • Bending Light Light travels in a straight path. Find out how get light to “bend” and follow a curved stream of water! View »
  • Plate Tectonics Activity Here is a fascinating activity that will help you give your students a better understanding of Earth's structure and how it creates tectonic plate movement. View »
  • Volcano in the Classroom Here’s a safe, easy, and vivid interpretation of a classic activity that won’t break the budget. All you’ll need are a few common items—a beaker, sand, water, a candle, and a hot plate. View »
  • Activities with UV Beads Ultraviolet-sensitive beads change color when exposed to ultraviolet (UV) light. They are inexpensive, yet give students a way to detect the presence of UV light, which is normally invisible to humans. Here are 2 inquiry-based activities that enable students to investigate UV light using these remarkable beads. View »
  • Under The Dome: Demonstrations with a Vacuum Pump Get out your vacuum pump for engaging activities and demonstrations designed to enrich your lessons on the properties of gases. View »
  • Make the Invisible Visible: Detecting IR Light with a Smart Phone When it comes to light, there’s more than meets the eye. But with a smartphone camera and a remote control, you can make the invisible visible and show your students infrared light. View »
  • Optics of the Human Eye A cross-curricular lesson in biology and physics allows students to make a simple model of the human eye. Students investigate how geometric optics can be applied to this complex, biological structure in order to describe how the images we see are formed when special tissues in our eye, the cornea and the lens, refract the light entering the pupil to create an image on the back wall of the eyeball (the retina), like a miniature, organic movie projector. View »
  • The Physics of Vision Get ready to investigate parallax and depth perception with 2 activities you can complete in less than 30 minutes. View »
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