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Classroom Activities

  • Violet Shines Blue Classic demo with a violet laser pointer may be used as a discrepant event to discuss light waves, fluorescence, or chemical quenching. View »
  • Bending Light Light travels in a straight path. Find out how get light to “bend” and follow a curved stream of water! View »
  • Stoichiometry and Limiting Reactant Develop a model for a limiting reactant in a chemical reaction, analyze combining ratios for reactions, and write balanced equations for them. Activity supports NGSS instruction. View »
  • Energy Is Energy Energy that we use has to come from somewhere. Even though one form of energy may seem different from another form, it really is all the same. Energy is energy. View »
  • Make the Invisible Visible: Detecting IR Light with a Smart Phone When it comes to light, there’s more than meets the eye. But with a smartphone camera and a remote control, you can make the invisible visible and show your students infrared light. View »
  • More Paper Clip Chemistry Who knew the common paper clip could be such a versatile teaching assistant? This activity uses several paper clip styles to help students understand empirical formulas and relative masses. View »
  • A New Approach to Teaching Atomic Theory For chemistry teacher Siobhan Julian, teaching the history of atomic theory by lecture “was dry and tedious and boring for everyone involved.” Then she took a fresh approach—one that focuses on doing science to learn science history. View »
  • Optics of the Human Eye A cross-curricular lesson in biology and physics allows students to make a simple model of the human eye. Students investigate how geometric optics can be applied to this complex, biological structure in order to describe how the images we see are formed when special tissues in our eye, the cornea and the lens, refract the light entering the pupil to create an image on the back wall of the eyeball (the retina), like a miniature, organic movie projector. View »
  • The Physics of Vision Get ready to investigate parallax and depth perception with 2 activities you can complete in less than 30 minutes. View »
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