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Classroom Activities

  • Crystal Growing Lab Introduce your students to crystal growing with this engaging activity. View »
  • Exploring Air Resistance Investigate the relationship between velocity and air resistance. View »
  • Newton's Law of Cooling Confirm Newton's law of cooling by collecting and analyzing data on samples of water undergoing a temperature change. View »
  • Ideal Atwood Machine Use this classic physics problem to analyze the forces acting on a set of weights suspended over a pulley. Calculate the acceleration of the system by applying knowledge of Newton's second law of motion, free-body diagrams, and kinematics. View »
  • Demonstration of Constant Acceleration Introduce the concept of constant acceleration with this engaging and challenging activity. View »
  • Determining Charge with an Electroscope Determine the polarity of materials charged with static electricity by using an electroscope. View »
  • Egg-cellent Chemistry: Teach Key Concepts by Decorating Eggs Decorating eggs is a fun way for students to explore a range of scientific concepts (such as pH and acids and bases) and make real-world connections. Here are 2 activities that are to dye for! View »
  • Violet Shines Blue Classic demo with a violet laser pointer may be used as a discrepant event to discuss light waves, fluorescence, or chemical quenching. View »
  • Derivation of the Kinematics Equation A solid understanding of kinematics equations and how to employ them to solve problems is essential for success in physics. Take a quick look the algebraic derivations behind these equations. View »
  • Bending Light Light travels in a straight path. Find out how get light to “bend” and follow a curved stream of water! View »
  • Sweet and Colorful Density Column In this activity, students determine the density of a variety of sugar solutions and layer them to form a density column. View »
  • Single Function Signal Generator Want to avoid using expensive equipment to generate a variety of electrical waveforms for your students to analyze? Think flowers! But not just any flowers—think plastic, solar-powered, dancing flowers. View »
  • Electricity and Magnetism Electricity and magnetism are mentioned together so often they must be related. How are they connected? How can their relationship be used to make beneficial technology? Here’s a quick lab activity that can help your students find the answers to these questions. View »
  • A Day in the Life with Common Simple Machines Choose from activities that engage beginning students in identifying machines and their types or activities that challenge more advanced students to design machines to accomplish chosen tasks. View »
  • Accuracy Versus Precision Beanbag Toss In this activity, students engage in a game of beanbag toss—but instead of merely keeping score, they explore statistical concepts such as mean, median, mode, and range. View »
  • Acid-Base Indicators This introduction to acid-base indicators includes a helpful table of Carolina's indicator ranges, the pH values of common household acids and bases, plus a fun "invisible ink" demonstration that you and your students will enjoy. View »
  • Can Crusher Amaze your students by crushing an aluminum beverage can without striking a single blow. During the demonstration, explain how air pressure crushes the can and discuss the use of terms associated with atmospheric pressure. View »
  • Density Column Inquiry Challenge Why does oil and vinegar salad dressing require vigorous shaking before use? Ask your students after this activity of building a density column to illustrate density and solubility. View »
  • Egg Vacuum Activity Demonstrate to your students the gas laws of physical science with this engaging activity. View »
  • Student Sheet: Keeping a Science Notebook Help students learn to be scientists by using a science notebook. Use our handy student sheet for ideas. View »
  • Dry Ice Explosion Demonstrate the physical states of carbon dioxide with the help of this video. View »
  • Aquarium Equilibrium Demonstration Use 2 aquariums and water for this guided-inquiry demonstration that introduces students to the concepts of reversible reactions and equilibrium. View »
  • Gay-Lussac's Law Temperature-Pressure Relationship in Gases and the Determination of Absolute Zero In this experiment, students observe the relationship between the pressure and temperature of a constant number of moles of gas in a constant-volume container, and experimentally determine an estimated value for absolute zero. View »
  • If Life Hands You Lemons Make a Battery Demonstrate how batteries work with a fresh approach: use lemons for the liquid electrolyte that completes an electric circuit. View »
  • Magical Light on the Microscopic World This activity introduces your students to 2 lighting techniques that will increase their understanding of the microscope and help them discover the hidden beauty of the microscopic world. View »
  • Mirror Mirror Do you want to stimulate some critical thinking in your classroom? Tell your class that we do not see living or inanimate things; we only see the light reflected from those things. View »
  • Three Little Salts When 3 seemingly identical white salts are dissolved in water, 3 strikingly different results occur. Use this simple experiment to teach your students about thermochemistry, chemical and physical changes. View »
  • Multiple Intelligences and Lab Safety How you perceive the world is how you learn about it. Get tips on applying the concept of multiple intelligences to topics and content areas. View »
  • Penny Skins Find out exactly what a penny's made of with this quick and easy activity that can be used for elementary, middle or high school students. View »
  • Petri Dish Electrolysis Activity Introduce your students to reduction-oxidation reactions and some of the basic terms of electrochemistry (such as electrode potential, anode, and cathode) with this activity—creating electrolysis in a petri dish. View »
  • Red and Green Slime Show Properties of Light and More: An Introduction to Slime How much do you know about that chemistry class staple, slime? Learn how to teach an engrossing lesson exploring slime’s complex physical and chemical properties. View »
  • Seeing the Solar System in a New Dimension: Unlock the Mystery of 3-D Imaging Trendy 3-D special effects on movie screens grab and keep your students' attention. Now use their fascination with mutli-dimensions to discuss visual perception, optics, and colors while studying the solar system. View »
  • Simplifying Circuits In this activity, students build and test various circuits while investigating how electric circuits work. View »
  • Summer Science How can you keep students thinking about science over summer break? We suggest offering them science-based activities that they can do on their own without much expense or equipment. View »
  • Understanding Unfamiliar Units: What Is a Light Year? Here's an activity that gets your students moving while they practice measuring units. By putting time and distance traveled into units students can directly relate to, the abstract concept of the light year is more easily understood. View »
  • Use Bubbles—Observe Wind Speed and Direction: Ask a Question and Plan an Experiment Children love working with bubbles. With this in mind, Carolina™ Curriculum has developed an activity to help students form an investigable question and then plan an experiment to measure wind speed and direction using bubbles. View »
  • Finding the Elements Experience the Finding the Elements Demo Chemistry kit in this video. View »
  • What Is Matter? Help your students understand the methodology behind classifying matter with this hands-on activity. View »
  • Where's the Fat? In this activity, students learn extraction procedures by separating fat from a snack food. They analyze the effectiveness of their chemical extraction procedure by comparing actual results with their predicted results. View »
  • Food Calorimetry: How to Measure Calories in Food Help your students learn how to determine the calories in food with this hands-on lab activity. Using common, inexpensive materials, students construct a calorimeter and test several food samples to determine their energy content. Addresses selected National Science Education Standards for grades 9–12. View »
  • The Science of Popcorn Teach a great lesson on the gas laws and complement it with this fun inquiry activity about the science behind popcorn’s pop. Students pop several brands of popcorn in the lab and determine each brand’s moisture content and the internal pressure required to make the kernels pop. View »
  • Making Audio Speakers from Household Materials Your students enjoy listening to their favorite play lists on MP3 players and cell phones. With this engaging inquiry activity, now they can understand how their headphones or speakers create the sounds they love. They will make speakers from ordinary household materials and, in the process, discover the science of how speakers create sound. View »
  • Build the Fastest Car in the World...that Goes Roughly 0.1 m/s The inclined plane can be used to explore a variety of fundamental concepts, including static and kinetic friction, dynamic equilibrium, unbalanced forces, and the work-energy theorem. In this experiment, your students design a car using the Visual Scientifics system and a smartphone. View »
  • Chemoween and Other Spooky Science Treat your students to some spirited demos and hands-on activities, and celebrate Halloween as the finale to your October science explorations. View »
  • Modeling a Comet in the Classroom Make an active comet model that’s guaranteed to grab your students’ attention. This demonstration models the nucleus of a comet using dry ice and a mixture of common ingredients found in comets. Not only does the model look like a comet, it gives off jets of vapor simulating the tail released by real comets. View »
  • Holiday Demonstrations and Activities Nearing the holiday season? Students having trouble focusing in class? When student minds wander, try these holiday-oriented demonstrations and activities to recapture their attention. We include a variety of activities, so everyone can have fun and still be learning important science concepts. View »
  • Hovercrafts in the Classroom Designing and building hovercrafts is an engaging STEM experience for students. They become involved with science, learn from one another, enjoy the process, and take pride in a creating a masterpiece of their own. View »
  • Solar Cell Misconceptions All of your students have seen photovoltaic solar cells used in a variety of ways; however, students may have misconceptions in understanding what influences solar cell output. This activity sets the record straight and explores how ambient temperature and the angle of illumination can affect solar cell output in volts. View »
  • The Conical Pendulum A great activity for physics classes investigating centripetal force and uniform circular motion. View »
  • Volcano in the Classroom Here’s a safe, easy, and vivid interpretation of a classic activity that won’t break the budget. All you’ll need are a few common items—a beaker, sand, water, a candle, and a hot plate. View »
  • Imploding Soda Cans: An Inquiry Approach Your students have probably seen someone crush an empty beverage can with their bare hands, or have even crushed one themselves. But have they ever seen an open can seemingly crush itself, like magic, without the presence of a visible, physical force? View »
  • Activities with UV Beads Ultraviolet-sensitive beads change color when exposed to ultraviolet (UV) light. They are inexpensive, yet give students a way to detect the presence of UV light, which is normally invisible to humans. Here are 2 inquiry-based activities that enable students to investigate UV light using these remarkable beads. View »
  • Under The Dome: Demonstrations with a Vacuum Pump Get out your vacuum pump for engaging activities and demonstrations designed to enrich your lessons on the properties of gases. View »
  • Making Magnetic Slime Everyone loves slime and magnets. Now you can integrate both into your lesson on magnetic properties! This activity is every bit as engaging as it is educational. Your students are sure to give it 2 (slimy) thumbs up! View »
  • Newton’s Laws, Friction, and Hovercraft With this Carolina Essentials™ activity, students build a simple hovercraft that illustrates Newton’s laws of motion and frictional force. View »
  • Energy Is Energy Energy that we use has to come from somewhere. Even though one form of energy may seem different from another form, it really is all the same. Energy is energy. View »
  • Make the Invisible Visible: Detecting IR Light with a Smart Phone When it comes to light, there’s more than meets the eye. But with a smartphone camera and a remote control, you can make the invisible visible and show your students infrared light. View »
  • Ring and Disc Demonstration Gain a deeper understanding of the classic ring and disc physics demonstration designed to introduce the concepts of rotational inertia, rotational motion, and rolling motion. View »
  • What's the Buzz About? Sound in a Vacuum Sound waves require a medium through which they travel. No medium (even air), no sound. Easily demonstrate this concept with a vacuum pump, buzzer, and jar. View »
  • Sweet Solutions for Science on a Shoestring, Part 2 Few science teachers have an unlimited supplies budget. If you need to trim expenses, one “sweet solution” is using inexpensive household materials in your labs. This activity with powdered drink mix will still let you teach key science concepts. View »
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