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Genetic Corn Seed, Green:Albino

Item # 177130
Genetic Corn Seed, Green:Albino is rated 4.8 out of 5 by 6.
  • y_2018, m_2, d_23, h_8
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Study Dominant vs. Recessive Traits

  • Easy to score
  • Can see results in just 14 days
  • For teaching dominance/recessiveness
3:1. In just 2 weeks, students can reap the benefits of growing their own corn that demonstrates dominant and recessive genes. From an albino strain giving a ratio of 3 green:1 albino in the seedlings.

About 100 seeds per pack.

Price

$11.50

In stock and available to ship.

Study Dominant vs. Recessive Traits

  • Easy to score
  • Can see results in just 14 days
  • For teaching dominance/recessiveness
3:1. In just 2 weeks, students can reap the benefits of growing their own corn that demonstrates dominant and recessive genes. From an albino strain giving a ratio of 3 green:1 albino in the seedlings.

About 100 seeds per pack.

 
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Try it! WOW this is really amazing! I love it and wish I could use it more often!
Date published: 2017-06-20
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Wonderful learning tool! Growing this corn for a monohybrid lab helps the students visualize the phenotype. Using corn as an example is also good because most of my students come from a farm background so they tend to ask more questions about the corn and how it was created.
Date published: 2015-04-14
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Engaging My corn seeds have all ready sprouted! They grew very well (and quickly) which made studying Mendelian inheritance much easier.
Date published: 2015-02-03
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Great for Entry-Level Mendelian Genetics Experiments Very easy to use: bigger than tobacco seeds and less trouble than fruit flies! My homeschooled students (8th-10th graders) simply put a few handfuls of gravel into shallow take-out containers with clear lids, added an inch of potting soil, and planted their corn seeds. All were placed on window sills in November in Virginia, so not ideal growing conditions -- but they did beautifully for our purposes. The planting with the warmest ambient air and most direct sunlight grew fastest, as one might expect, but it also had results closest to the predicted 3:1 phenotypic ratios. The least "happy" plantings not only had lower germination rates, but also lower percentages of albino plants. My students hypothesized that maybe the albinos are a bit less sturdy under unfavorable growing conditions. Five stars for a very good material for a basic genetics experiment that illustrates real-life variability. (PS: An earlier reviewer mentioned tweaking the math to obtain 3:1 ratios. I shared this notion with my students and was proud that they immediately saw the problem. Real science is messier and so much better!)
Date published: 2012-12-04
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Very visual genetics demo The corn grew well, but we got significantly more green than white so I had to manipulate the data to get a little closer to the expected 3:1. The students were impressed by the white plants.
Date published: 2009-01-27
  • y_2018, m_2, d_23, h_8
  • bvseo_bulk, prod_bvrr, vn_bulk_2.0.7
  • cp_1, bvpage1
  • co_hasreviews, tv_1, tr_5
  • loc_en_US, sid_177130, prod, sort_[SortEntry(order=SUBMISSION_TIME, direction=DESCENDING)]
  • clientName_carolina
  • bvseo_sdk, java_sdk, bvseo-4.0.0
  • CLOUD, getReviews, 6ms
  • REVIEWS, PRODUCT